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Counselling for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

 

While Brydan does not identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, he values working with and helping those who do to improve their social emotional well-being.  

Brydan has an interest in working with client groups with greater mental health risks, including those who identify as First Nations Peoples. This interest partly comes from his work as a criminologist and his awareness of the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait people within the criminal justice system. It also partly comes from working with offenders  within the prison system as a mental health clinician, young people in Headspace and clients across both community mental health and private practive environments. However, it mostly comes from his values of acknowledging the traditional custodians of Australia and seeking to contribute towards improving the lives of those that have been impacted by past injustices.  

Brydan supports a strengths based approach to mental health. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have many protective factors, and these can include aspects such as cultural practices, self-determination, social connectedness and a sense of belonging, and connection to land, culture, spirituality and ancestry. However, First Nations Peoples' social emotional wellbeing can be significantly impacted by several factors such as: 

  • racial discrimination

  • impacts of the Stolen Generations and removal of children

  • unresolved trauma

  • economic and social disadvantage

  • incarceration

  • violence

  • substance misuse

  • separation from culture and identity issues

Brydan acknowledges the Gayaa Dhuwi (Proud Spirit) Declaration and regularly reflects on his practice within the mental health system towards implementing the declaration and the Nine principles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social emotional wellbeing.

 

Brydan's approach to therapy is collaborative and respectful of clients' intersectional identities, including their connection to one or multiple cultures. Where clients identify a connection to improving emotional social wellbeing beyond Western views of mental health, he seeks to create a safe space that supports collaboratively embracing Aboriginal perspectives to better support his clients and address the complex interplay of historical trauma, systemic injustices, and cultural strengths to promote holistic wellbeing and self-determination where relevant. 

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Social and Emotional Wellbeing

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Social and Emotional Wellbeing

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Social and Emotional Wellbeing
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Social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal people - Broken Hill, NSW

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Book Online

If you’re a private paying or Medicare client, or your employer has a Service Agreement with Brydan for EAP, please book online

Phone call

If you’d like to start with a confidential and friendly chat to explore your options, please call Brydan on 0404 607 479.

Email

If you’d like to contact Brydan, ask a question or get help to book an appointment, please fill the online contact form or email.

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